Plenary Lectures

Plenary Lectures

Plenary Lectures
Prof. Young W. Kwon
Distinguished Professor, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Naval Postgraduate School, USA
Editor, Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology (ASME Transactions)
Editor, Multiscale and Multidisciplinary Modeling, Experiments and Design (Springer Nature)
Director, Center for Materials Research

Failures in Perspective of Multiscale and Multiphysics

Abstract Biography

Abstract
Most of engineering materials have their hierarchical structures at different length scales. The structure in each length scale influences one another and eventually the macroscale properties of the materials. In order to understand and predict macroscale properties of materials, it is important to analyze the characteristics and bridging of different length scale structures. To this end, multiscale modeling has been developed for different materials such as composites, metals, biomaterials, etc. This presentation will focuse on a multiscale analysis model developed for various composites materials as well as biomaterials including new failure criteria based on distinctive failure mechanisms of the constituent materials such as fiber failure, matrix cracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding. The criteria use the stress and strain occurring in the fiber and matrix materials. Furthermore, many engineering structures, especially for marine applications, interact with fluid media, Then, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) becomes an important issue, and FSI can change the failure loads as well as failure locations. The presentation will address such problems with composite structures.

Biography
Young Kwon is Distinguished Professor of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department of the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, California, USA. He also serves as Director of the Materials Research Center at NPS and was the Chair of the department. Previously, he was Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes of Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC). He received his Ph.D. degree from Rice University, and B.S. degree from Seoul National University, all in mechanical engineering. Before joining NPS, he was Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri-Rolla. His research interests are multiscale, multiphysics and multidisciplinary problems in engineering and sciences. He wrote multiple books, Finite Element Method using MATLAB which was translated into Greek, Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling: Techniques and Applications, and Composite Structures for Fluid-Structure Interaction. He edited a book titled Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Composite Materials and Structures. He received many awards including the Cedric K. Ferguson Medal, Menneken Awards, Excellent Research Award from American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicines, Outstanding Instruction and Research Awards, ASME Dedicated Service Award, ASME PVPD Outstanding Service Award, ASME Board of Governors Award, ASME PVP Medal, National Dean’s List, etc. He is a fellow of ASME. He serves as Technical Editor for ASME Transactional, Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology, as well as Multiscale and Multidisciplinary Modeling, Experiments and Design published by Springer Nature. He was a ASME PVP Division Chair.

Prof. Hyung-Seop Shin
Andong National University, Korea

To be determined


Prof. Gang Liu
Xi셙n Jiaotong University, China

To be determined


Prof. Nobuhiro Yoshikawa
The University of Tokyo, Japan

Meso-scale Fracture Modeling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

Abstract Biography

Abstract
The safety of the Carbon Fiber Reinforce Plastic (CFRP) members have been mostly examined by the qualification and production tests so far since the Finite Element (FE) modeling of CFRP members were not so sophisticated enough as to yield reliable failure analysis result. Instead of conventional continuum-based modeling method, we have proposed meso-scale modeling, where carbon fiber and resin are exactly separated. Strength models of carbon fiber and resin are directly introduced for adequate strength prediction of CFRP members. We exemplify the merit of the proposed methodology in a problem of high pressure hydrogen container for fuel cell vehicle. The tank is made by filament winding method. Local strain enhancement in carbon fiber bundle caused by cross-over is precisely evaluated and the burst pressure of the tank is adequately predicted by means of the meso-scale finite element analysis.
Biography
Nobuhiro Yoshikawa is a professor at the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan since 2005. He obtained his BS and MS degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Tokyo in 1985 and 1987, respectively and Ph.D. degree. in Mechanical Engineering at the same affiliation, the University of Tokyo in 1990. He has spent over 30 years in his research as from a research associate to a professor at Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo in Japan. He served in charge of the head of the 92nd Material Dynamics Division of JSME. His research interests include Developing methodology of structural safety and reliability analyses by means of finite element method, especially in the application for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP); (1) Developing finite element simulation system named Front_COMP for strength evaluation of CFRP members based on meso-scale model separating resin/carbon fiber bundle. (2) Developing high pressure hydrogen vessel for Fuel Cell Vehicles and hydrogen station. (3) Developing fun blade of jet engine made by CFRP.

Prof. Elena Pasternak
University of Western Australia, Australia

Topological Interlocking as a Method of Improving Structural Integrity and Resilience

Abstract Biography

Abstract
Ancient mortarless structures that is segmented/blocky structures without binder with segments holding together on gravity friction are known to have amazing resilience to external impacts and vibration. This can be attributed to the relative movement of segments/blocks that increases the dissipation of the vibration energy. The need for high block mass to mobilise gravity restricts the used segmented materials. This is where the principal of topological interlocking assists by providing considerable kinematic constraint preventing the block removal from the structure. This is achieved by either specially engineered block shape (e.g., osteomorphic blocks, Fig. 1 [1]) which provides interlocking without stress concentrators such as keys or connectors, or by special arrangements of simple shapes such as Platonic solids (e.g., octahedra, Fig. 2 [1]). This enables manufacturing hybrid materials and structures whose integrity is only maintained by providing peripheral constraint. These materials and structures are characterised by increased fracture resistance and energy absorption. Some topological interlocking structures also exhibit high tolerance to missing blocks. Since the segments/blocks are not directly connected to each other the described principal also allows creating hybrid materials of segments/blocks made of different not necessarily compatible materials thus increasing the dimension of the parametric space (e.g., [2]) in designing hybrid materials.


Fig. 1 Assembled from osteomorphic blocks

Fig. 2 Interlocking assembly of octahedra
Biography
Professor Elena Pasternak received BSc and MSc in Mechanics and Applied Mathematics in 1997 from Dnepropetrovsk State University, Ukraine and PhD in 2002 from the University of Western Australia. In 2002 she became a Humboldt Fellow at Technical University of Clausthal. In 2003-2006 Elena was an Australian Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Western Australia. Currently, she is a Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Western Australia.

Professor Pasternak셲 research interests cover different areas in fracture mechanics, rock mechanics, wave propagation and vibrations, topological interlocking, auxetics and negative stiffness. This determines a wide range of leading journals she publishes in such as fracture mechanics journals Int. J of Fracture and Engineering Fracture Mechanics, rock mechanics journals: Int. J. of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences and Rock Mechanic sand Rock Engineering, engineering journals: Int. J. of Engineering Science, Solids and Structures and J. of Sound and Vibrations. Professor Pasternak is President of the Australian Fracture Group.